Cold Water Combos

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Article by: Brennan Chapman
Posted: Dec 3, 2019

Cold Water Walleye

If you’re reading this from the Midwest or even further north, you’re probably scratching your head thinking, “its ice fishing season, right?” Well, perhaps. For some of us brave souls, there are some open water fishing opportunities ahead and for many further south, plenty of great days of cold water fishing yet to be had. However, you are now fishing harder for fewer bites, and that is something that you have to settle with before you grab your keys and walk out that door. Your scaly friend’s metabolisms are slowing down quickly and if that hasn’t been reflected yet in your amount of daily hooksets, rest assured that it will. It is time to downsize your presentation, slow it down, and put your patience to the test. For us tackle crafters, we can now hone in on the details that now matter the most, by tweaking, altering, and creating specific baits, baits that you just can’t find in stores, which will have us back to setting hooks in no time. 

How to Build an Umbrella Rig

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Article by: Matt Luna
Posted: Nov 13, 2019

Umbrella Rig

Years ago the umbrella rig took the fishing industry by storm after Paul Elias destroyed the competition using an umbrella rig.  The fish didn’t seem to know the difference between a real school of shad and the school effect the umbrella rig provided.  As time passed, the umbrella rig craze has slowed, but the umbrella rig is still an effective presentation, and has come to be a great tactic in the fall and winter to get those cold water fish to bite.

The Ripper

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Article by: Steve Miller
Posted: Nov 7, 2019

Ripper soft bait make your own

When Do-it first introduced The Ripper I was excited, no excited would be an understatement. At first glance I could see It’s ribbed body, standout belly design and its very unique boot style tail would make the Ripper a game changer!


Pan Fish Go To - Mayday Mayflies and Bat Jigs

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Article by: Brennan Chapman

Mayday Mayfly

There isn’t a freshwater fish that won’t eat an insect. The Mayday Mayfly flat out fools them.  More times than not, the Mayfly is the big fish bait of the day when targeting pan fish. While live bait may get you more bites, these catch quality and when you get a bite, you won’t need a bobber to tell you so.


Jigs - Custom Crafted for Specific Applications

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by: Max Baranczyk

My family has a cabin in northern Wisconsin, and this is where it all began. The lakes we fish are deep, clear, natural lakes with populations of smallmouth and largemouth bass. Initially we didn’t have any electronics and usually fished from a pontoon or a 14 foot johnboat. This meant that I had to learn quickly as to where the fish moved throughout the year instead of depending on electronics to find them. I spent a lot of time snorkeling and diving these lakes to find where the fish were. I also read every article that the Linder's and In-Fisherman had on seasonal movements of fish.

Tutorial on Tying Hair Jigs

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by Dr. Guy Jensen


Thanks to Al Linder and the staff at Angling Edge, the Hair Jig is making a resurgence. This Jig has shown its effectiveness for catching all species of game fish for many years. If you love making your own jigs like I have done for 37 years, you will enjoy making your own hair jigs. There are, however, some characteristics of deer hair that can be somewhat challenging. My experience goes back over 20 years of tying trout flies with elk and deer hair. The biggest problem with any kind of animal hair is that it tends to spin on the hook shank when you try to tie it in place. I will demonstrate the proper technique for positioning and securing the hair on the hook in the video.

The Two Most Important Factors for Your Spinnerbait Build

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by Matt Luna


If you’ve never built a spinnerbait before you may be feeling overwhelmed, or maybe you’ve built one and it’s not catching fish, and you’re not sure what to change. There are so many different components that go into a spinnerbait build that it can seem overwhelming or difficult to know where you went wrong. There’s hook choices, different diameter wire forms, and clevis’, to choosing the skirt color, blade types, and swivels. Hopefully, I can shed some light on this topic and focus your attention to the two factors I believe are the most important when it comes to building a spinnerbait.

6 Inch Finesse Crawler

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by Steve Miller

Do-it has a wide variety of worm molds and they all have a time and place for every fish. There are times when the fish want a real slow presentation. One of my favorite baits for this set up is the 6 inch finesse crawler in the essential series. This soft plastic mold has five cavities that allow you to make up a bunch quick.

Dual Injection Molding - the process of injecting two colors at once

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by Brennan Chapman

Dual, twin, laminate colors, whichever you prefer to call it, is the process of injecting two colors at once. This offers bait makers the ability to imitate natural forages that our game species target. It also allows us to make some pretty wild stuff. Depending on the clarity and forage in the body of water I am fishing that day, I could be shooting baits to imitate a shiner, bluegill, crawfish, or something bright that is sure to grab the attention of fish in water with poor visibility. 

Tube Jigs - The catch-all lure for all seasons

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By Marc Wisniewski

Thirty years ago, two brothers invented a soft plastic lure with a hollow body and a tail full of tentacles that looked like an over active squid.  Garry and Bobby Garland, no longer with us any more, tuned fishing upside down with this invention.  The plastic lure called the Gitzit didn’t look like anything that  swam in freshwater and not too much in salt water either.  Or did it?

Custom Blending Powder Paints

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by Kyle Steinfeldt

One of the great elements of making your own tackle is the ability to make something custom.  Whether it be your favorite crankbait blank airbrushed in a color pattern you’re not able to buy at your local Fleet Farm, a jig with some custom glitter and dipped in a UV Seal Coat or a can’t buy anywhere on the shelf soft plastic dipped in pearlescent powder there is something intriguing about using something no one else has and more importantly something that fish have not seen before. 

Heavy Jigs for Heavy Current

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by Steve Miller

Typically most anglers fishing in strong current will use some sort of a three-way setup. Most of the time the weight will be a bell or pencil sinker.  What I have been using a lot lately are heavy jigs for my dropper.  Why not add a hook and catch more fish, plus by building your own, it’s not a problem to lose a few. 

Do-It has a great variety of heavy jigs in all the popular styles.  A couple of my go-to jigs are the Style H jig and the large teardrop jig. 

Same Weight Different Bait

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by Jared Roper


Have you ever been crappie fishing and suddenly the crappie that was on fire yesterday, or as recent as earlier that day, is now barely eating your jig? You feel a thump and a bump, set the hook, and nothing is there. That doesn’t happen just once or even three times but a bunch of times that day. The thought comes to mind to go smaller and lighter, but there are two problems — its 10 MPH winds gusting 13-15 MPH, and you’re fishing 15-feet deep. The 1/8th oz. jig head is the perfect weight, but the big bait is not the ticket. 

Jigs

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by Jake Hendrickson

I would have to say that a jig of some sort is tied to the end of my line 95% of the time while out on the water. I learned how to jig fish at a young age from my dad, who showed me the finer details of how to fish a jig properly. He told me to visualize what your jig is doing when you are lifting, twitching or snapping it through the water. I went through many different styles over the years trying to find one that I found to perform the way I wanted. Through my searches I happened upon getting into making my own jigs, starting out with your standard collared round head jig, and now most days I have a tear drop style jig on my line.

Why go “Do-It” and is it worth it?

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by Theron Asbery

I’ve been honored to be a part of Do-It molds for 3 years now, but really my Christmas gift when I was 12 years old was when it all started. That year was when I got the materials and lead pouring supplies to start making my own crappie and white bass jigs. Fifteen years have passed an my mold collection has grown substantially and in my co-angler days on the FLW Tour, I was always the guy known for having the extra shaky heads and drop shot weights.

Bass, Pick Your Poison: New Weedless Jig Offers Versatility and Great Hooking

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Here in my home state of Wisconsin, it was one of the hottest summers on record. These extended periods of heat effected some fisheries in a negative way and some in a positive way. One of the few fish that reacted favorably was the Bass. For the Bass fisherman, both largemouth and smallmouth, many would agree that it was a banner year. The warmer than normal lake temps statewide had both species about as active as I have ever seen them.

Customize your casting spoons or jigging spoons

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Do-It Mold Products

In today’s world, it’s all about having your own theme or customizing everything. You can customize your Xbox 360, your desktop, even your iPhone. Why not customize your plain, dilapidated casting or jigging spoons. Just look at them, spoons may be the most unappealing lure anglers fish with…for real, though they hardly look realistic. Just think of how many more fish you could catch by customizing them. Why not put scale pattern decals, 3-D eyes, or a feather dressed tail on them? No doubt about it, the customized spoon will catch more fish.

Does Do-it Molds create custom molds?

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We get questions similar to the following on occasion:

For many years I have been using a particular jig that is very popular here on local lakes but I am no longer able to find them. I’ve looked through your catalog and have not found anything similar. If I were to send you a jig could I have a mold made that will cast these jigs?

Does a bottom pour furnace work with larger Egg-Slip Sinker and No-roll Sinkers (6 and 8 oz)?

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While bottom pour furnaces excel when pouring smaller jigs and sinkers their flow rate is limited and insufficient to fill cavities larger than 1-1/2 or 2 ounces. The limited flow rate many times results in wrinkled or incomplete castings. Those larger cavities are better poured with a ladle from a dip out style melter. This allows for a more rapid pour rate that fills the cavity before the lead begins to cool.

I am having a hard time removing the pull pin from my Egg Sinkers once casted. Is there some sort of trick?

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If the sinkers are allowed to cool removing the pin can be difficult if not impossible. The pull pin should be oiled slightly or smoked with candle soot before starting and occasionally during the pouring session. An oily rag works well. Insert the rod from the hinge end of the mold. After the lead is poured into the cavities, the pull pin should be removed immediately using a twisting motion. Failure to oil or smoke the pin before the first pour, or allowing the lead to cool in the mold will make withdrawal of the pin difficult.

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